Proptar Voice!

Proptar have officially introduced a new segment called “Proptar Voice”. A platform for young voices to be heard!

This gives young people the opportunity to voice their thoughts, opinions and experiences on current societal topics and matters.

Please bear in mind the opinions suggested in these pieces are solely of the writers themselves and do not represent the opinions of Proptar.

So, our first installment comes from an aspiring journalist,  @justlizziee, enjoy!

The Youth Writes ‘Rights’ Not ‘Injustices’

It’s interesting how the UK claims to have democracy and all but where’s this so called ‘democracy’ for 16-17 year olds when it comes to voting?

So democracy, what is it? The term ‘democracy’ as we know it, is defined to be ‘a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives’, so how can we possibly relate this to the UK, if it’s not the ‘whole population’ at all who have the right to contribute to this as a chunk of the population is boxed out – 16-17 years olds.

It’s understandable that a line needs to be drawn for those who are eligible to vote, but why must that line be drawn at 18? The idea that at 18 you suddenly become mature and hold the capacity to make moral decisions is inaccurate. Maturity and intellectual development does not suddenly appear on a teenagers 18th birthday, it is very much a gradual process, one that could almost certainly start before the age of 16. It is argued by the ignorant few, that 16 year olds don’t have the necessary political maturity or knowledge to hold the responsibility to vote; but isn’t this the same argument that was used against allowing under 30s to vote, allowing the working class to vote and even allowing women to vote in the 1920s? It is a widely shared view that it would be immoral to prevent any of these groups from voting today and it is equally immoral to prevent 16-17 years to be denied a say of who can represent them.

Excluding 16-17 years old a right to vote is wrong. This isn’t at all equality and justice – the qualities that the UK so profoundly like to claim possession of – this is unfair and unjust! 16 year olds in the UK should have a decision on what lies in their future. Let us be brutally honest, the older generation repeatedly voting the conservative party is not helping matters. I mean sure they have the right to vote, but what their vote accounts for doesn’t affect their future in the long term does it? It’s the younger generation who have to bear the brunt of the decisions made for them. I mean sure the older generation deserve the right to vote, but since when did their right become superior to that of teenagers? So in all honesty, denying 16-17 year olds the right to vote, allows the continuous advocating of other votes (predominantly that of the older generation) which thereby allows for the dominance of the conservative party in power to continue to encourage and support the rapidly increasing high university fees, now where’s the justice in that?

But deeply consider, if young people had access to votes, they’d be able to change this nightmarish cycle, similar concept to the ‘breaking of the glass ceiling’, seeking the compelling change they yearn for. That is the only way their justice will be served. As Kofi Annan, former secretary-general of the United Nations, accurately states, “Young people should be at the forefront of global change and innovation. Empowered, they can be key agents for development and peace. If, however, they are left on society’s margins, all of us will be impoverished. Let us ensure that all young people have every opportunity to participate fully in the lives of their societies.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s